The school is required to develop and deepen pupils’ understanding of the fundamental British values of democracy, individual liberty, the rule of law and mutual respect and tolerance.

Why?

  • Safeguarding – to keep students safe from radicalisation and extremism
  • Social Development (SMSC) – skills and attitudes that will allow students to participate fully in and contribute positively to life in modern Britain.
  • Ofsted Inspection Framework – personal development. Schools with ‘important weaknesses in the provision for pupils’ SMSC development’ are graded as inadequate.

We think we embed an understanding of FBV, but need to know precisely when and where across the curriculum to determine if this is true.

How the criteria of Fundamental British Values may be fulfilled

Respect and Tolerance
  • Persuasive Writing – Tolerance and consideration of different viewpoints
  • Reference to prejudice, discrimination, bullying or cyber bullying either now or throughout History.
  • Learning about other cultures and people from other cultures e.g. artists and musicians
  • Topics relating to friendships or relationships.
  • Learning about similarity or differences between cultures.
  • Undertaking research to understand other people’s viewpoints on a subject.
  • Debates in clubs or lessons.
The Rule of Law
  • Rules in the subject which relate to safety e.g. wearing goggles, safe internet use or the playing of a sport or game etc.
  • Learning related to crime or criminality e.g. a particular topic or reference to, copyright or plagiarism when essay writing
  • Learning about rules or laws in other countries
Democracy
  • Votes for any role or decision making within the subject area.
  • Looking at data from polls or elections
  • Learning related to the government in the UK or abroad.
Individual Liberty
  • Learning related to the rights people have.
  • References to the UNCRC as part of education on Children’s Rights

By Subject

Life Skills

Fundamental British Values are covered across the school curriculum. They are covered in Life Skills and Tutorial Times in the following areas as well as when these topics arise within other units of work.

  • Year 8 Term 2 Systems of Government
  • Year 11 Term 4 – Unit on Religion & Politics
  • Year 8 Term 1 Tutorials on the Government and Making of Laws
  • Decision making in Life Skills is often based on a vote
  • Year 8 Term 1 Moral Codes
  • Year 9 Term 4 – The law on the use of illegal substances in the UK
  • Year 9 Term 6 – Unit on religion, crime and the law.
  • Year 9 Term 4 – Tutorials on court systems in the UK and fair trial
  • Tutorials across all year groups focus on the law around a number of topics e.g. gambling, online behaviours, sexual relationships, drugs and alcohol
  • Year 8 Term 5 and Year 11 Term 3 Extremism
  • Year 9 Term 3 Radicalisation
  • Where equipment is used e.g. drunk goggles, clear rules relating to safety are given
  • Year 7 Term 4 Children’s Rights
  • Year 8 Term 4 Active Citizenship
  • Year 9 Term 5 – Rights
  • Year 11 Term 4 Lesson on social justice and human rights
  • Year 9 Term 1 – Tutorials on human rights
  • Year 9 Term 4 – Tutorials on state religion, protest groups and freedom of speech
  • Tutorials contain the school’s article of the week from the UNCRC
  • Lessons contain relevant articles from the UNCRC
  • Teaching of the 6 major world religions, including branches within those faiths. Teaching of other non-religious world views including Humanism and atheism.
  • Year 7 Term 5 Chance to read a book and meet with an author from the Islamic faith.
  • Year 8 Term 2 Prejudice and discrimination
  • Year 8 Term 3 – Multicultural Britain
  • Year 10 Term 2 – Prejudice
  • Year 7 Term 2 – Tutorials on 6 major world religions and term 4 their differing beliefs around the family.
  • Year 8 Term 2 – Tutorials on 6 major world religions and their places of worship.
  • Year 9 Term 2 – Tutorials on a number of issues relating to Religion and Identity
  • Year 8 Term 5 and Year 11 Term 3 Extremism
  • Pupils are encouraged to have a growth mindset and share their views and answers as well as listen respectfully to the opinions of others who may have different views.
Art

Art and Design is not a static subject, set within a specific time or experience, with a set of prescribed facts to acquire. It lives in the human condition and experience and is affected by changes in society. Activities are reviewed and updated constantly to reflect its “Living” qualities.

All Key Stages

  • All student opinions listened to and respected.
  • Freedom to voice opinions during class feedback sessions. Group sessions.
  • Research on the historical, social, political, personal context and how that impacts the Art work produced. Personal expression by responding to Artists (freedom to choose Artists / art work that is inspirational to the individual).
  • Exploration of materials to make independent decisions about what media they wish to use. Student autonomy in their personal projects.
  • Investigating artwork that challenges and represents issues connected directly with democracy and freedom of speech such as Banksy etc.

All Key Stages

  • The importance of Health and Safety in the Art room. The importance of routine for clearing materials at the end of a practical lesson. Interactive poster designs to allow students to consider the implications of specific tasks as well as resources on project websites.

Key Stage 3

  • At KS3 the projects are based on both practical skills development as well as contextual and critical understanding development. The Year 8 armour project focusses on such themes as; human rights, The impact of war PTSD. Personal expression, learning from artists perspective and opinion for example.

Key Stage 4 & 5

  • Students are taught to think morally and to distinguish between right and wrong. This is particularly evident in KS4 and KS5 where students develop their own message / meaning based on a portfolio of research that is both personal and experimental and culminates in a final piece.
  • Plagiarism monitoring digitally for GCSE photography students. Students producing evidence based slides within their decks to reference where images have been shot / produced.
  • Students are taught the importance of making adequate references to sources within A Level essays to document appropriate research criteria avoiding issues surrounding plagiarism.

All Key Stages

  • Students throughout each key stage are encouraged to develop independent portfolio projects. Students are encouraged to share their views whilst respecting the views of others, The subject embodies some the highest forms of human creativity.
  • Importance of reflection of ideas at all KS and developing into independent decision makers / learners becoming increasingly able to create images as a form of self-expression.
  • Choices for outcomes and key developmental points within unit are offered with increasingly independent decision making being undertaken – both for imagery and content as well as media and materials.

Key Stage 3

  • Key Stage 3 projects in each year group revisiting self identity and self expression through partiture specifically as a topic that is continually revisited.

Key Stage 4 & 5

  • Importance of independent learning at KS4 and 5.

All Key Stages

  • This is actively promoted in Art, where we aim to support students in understanding other viewpoints on complex issues that are often topical, cultural and social. Students research how artists from different cultures respond to themes in order to widen their knowledge and understanding on other viewpoints. Students learn about Art history in terms of researching the personal, political, social and historical context of the Artist making work at any given time. For example, Picasso knows how to paint realistically, however he chooses to distort his work to add weight to its meaning and expression.
  • Students are able to channel their thoughts and views about artwork, whilst respecting the views of others.
  • Group and shared projects working towards a shared outcome regardless of faith and belief systems. (Group transcriptions.) Working in teams to tidy and clear up after practical work. Throughout each KS students are encouraged to share ideas through presentation of designs, feedback, suggestions about areas that could be developed further.
  • Throughout each KS students are encouraged to look at artworks and traditions from other cultures. This is an important area of development.
  • Learning about similarity or differences between cultures and artists occurs throughout all key stages.
  • Discussion and debate surrounding personal viewpoints alongside traditional viewpoints within Art & Design across all key stages.

Key Stage 3

  • KS3 examples Year 7 formal elements consider the impact that dictators have had on society . How artists communicate the feeling of civilian. Picasso’s Guernica. discussions and considerations around Edward Munch scream, the mental health issues associated. Year 8 Graham Sutherland’s Crucifixion, Year 9 investigations into aspects such as Day of the Dead cross compared to other depictions of death and notions of an afterlife etc for example.
Computing

7.2 Kodu

  • Polls for evaluation feedback on games. Voting for games produced by pupils. Also listening to others feedback respectfully.

Key Stage 5 Project

  • Surveys to investigate project. Evaluation surveys to better understand how well we have met user need.

Key Stage 3, 4 & 5

  • Safe Internet use- reinforcing guidelines for safe internet use whenever it is being used for research/homework. How to report issues and who they should be reported to.

Key Stage 4 – GCSE 1.6

  • Copyright law, Data protection and Computer Misuse Act. Studied at GCSE in terms of the provision of these acts and the possible issues in their application in the real world for both business and individuals.

Key Stage 5 Social Ethical Impacts of Computing – Unit 1.5

  • Examining the Legal, social and Moral Impact of Computing

Key Stage 4 – GCSE 1.6

  • Digital Divide – how the digital divide means that some disadvantaged people do not have the same cultural capital as others

9.4 Game of Life

  • Understanding the real difficulties involved in making adult choices with budgets/jobs etc.

9.5 Big Data

  • Digital Divide – how the digital divide means that some disadvantaged people do not have the same cultural capital as others

8.1 & 9.1 Units

  • Cyberbullying – exploration of this issues. How we leave a digital footprint and hoe we have responsibility to behave respectfully online.

Key Stage 4 – GCSE 1.6

  • Environmental Factors – e-waste and the developing world. Exploitation of limited resources from the developing world to feed demand for technology. Dumping of harmful waste in India to avoid strict e-waste laws in Europe.

7.1, 8.1, 9.1

  • Tolerance for other’s viewpoints – use of peer review surveys and in discussion, pair work. Valuing each other’s feedback. Feeding back respectfully and courteously

7.2 Kodu

  • Polls for evaluation feedback on games. Voting for games produced by pupils. Also listening to others feedback respectfully.

Key Stage 5 Project

  • Surveys to investigate project

Key Stage 5 Social Ethical Impacts of Computing Unit 1.5

  • Examining the Legal, social and Moral Impact of Computing
Drama

Year 8

  • In unit on the case of Derek Bentley in 1953. Topic of capital punishment includes representing different points of view and opinions around capital punishment, we also consider where in the world this is still a possible punishment and what for.

Year 7

  • Exploring fables from different cultures includes reflecting on morals of stories told in the past and this includes the qualities of generosity, forgiveness and personal responsibility and diligence.

Year 7

  • Reference to Polytheism in unit on origins of Greek Theatre. This is linked back to their life skills tutorials on the different major religions.
DT

Key Stage 3

  • Groups decide on roles within a group with respect to manufacturing a number of products

Key Stage 4 & 5

  • Using data from polls in examinations

Year 12

  • Voting for subject prefects

Food

Students are able to voice opinions about their dishes when giving feedback. Students can also put themselves forward for roles within the Food department- for example- taking part in the house cooking competition/ being lead chef.

All

  • The use of PPE during practical activities that have safety regulations
  • Guarding on machinery that stipulates that requirement by law
  • Safety and legislation; patents, copywrites, trade marks

Key Stage 4 & 5

  • National and international standards in product design

Key Stage 5

  • CLEAPS guidance on all practical tasks with tools / equipment required
  • LEV extraction on machines that are creating small particles to be airborne
  • PAT testing on all electrical items

Food

Students are taught and explained why there are certain rules within the food room and know to abide by them in order to keep safe. Students are encouraged to be responsible for their actions.

All

  • Individual choices in the preference of products upon their own deductions. Often discussed in a group format.
  • Freedom to have an individual choice in design outcomes.

Key Stage 4 & 5

  • Inclusive design; products with disabilities catered for.
  • Freedom to chose problems to be solved.

Food

Students know that this is a safe space, and that the freedom to make choices is for their benefit. I aim to empower students, encouraging them to be responsible and to enjoy the subject. There are a range of further challenges within the subject as well as numerous opportunities throughout the school year which will seek to make a positive impact on students.

All

  • Target markets are decided and focussed on during project work.
  • Designers from various back groups are researched with key features being used in design proposals.
  • Design movements originating from different cultures are researched with key features being used in design proposals.
  • Client interviews to understand other people’s viewpoints on a subject, leading to focussed research.

Key Stage 4

  • Cultural design; ensuring that different cultures aren’t offended by design proposals.
  • Cultural design; ensuring that different cultures aren’t offended by design proposals.

Food

Encouraging children to celebrate multicultural settings by having lessons where the focus is on different cuisines and cultures, allowing students to share their heritage with the rest of the group. Students are aware that there will be no tolerance or unfairness of discrimination based on someone’s faith, culture or beliefs.

Economics

Year 10

  • Govt role as an economic agent.

Year 10 & 13

  • CMA – prevention of unfair competition in markets.

Year 11 & 12

  • Learning related to govt fiscal policy and the govt influence on the economy.
  • Crime as a consequence of high level of unemployment.

Year 13

  • Learning related to govt fiscal policy and the govt influence on the economy.
  • Corruption as a limit to growth and development.

Year 11 & 12

  • Year 11 + 12 Crime as a consequence of high level of unemployment.

Year 12

  • Year 12 – Deregulation as a supply-side policy.

Year 13

  • Year 13 – Protectionism in relation to international trade.
  • Year 13 – Lack of regulations as part of development economics and deregulation as a supply-side policy.in other countries.
  • Year 13 – Labour market regulations.
  • Year 13 – Global Institutions such as the IMF, World Bank, WTO

Year 10

  • Costs and benefits of economic choices
  • Freedom to be educated – inequalities and choices
  • Consideration of different types of economies: free market and planned

Year 12

  • Consideration of different economies: free market and planned.

Listen to each others points of view when answering questions in class – whether income inequality is fair, is a good example of this.

Year 11 & 12

  • The impact of unemployment on family relationships.

Year 11 & 13

  • Discrimination as a reason for income inequalities

Year 12

  • Consideration of different economic thinkers.

Year 13

  • Religious beliefs, and cultural differences being a cause/limit to economic growth and development in some developing countries. (prevalence of forced marriage/lack of contraception)
English

Year 7

  • Rhetoric – political speeches and the use of language to manipulate
  • Legends in Literature in Y7 – understanding power and where power comes from (in heroes)

Year 9

  • Dystopia – discussing government control
  • Romanticism – Blake being anti-establishment

Year 10

  • Power & Conflict poetry – Ozymandias and tyrannical rule, London and criticism of establishment, Checking Out Me History and Eurocentric education, Storm on the Island and the Troubles
  • Macbeth – rulers/treason/kingship/governing

Year 12

  • Supernatural – criticism of governing bodies in post civil war USA and Victorian Britain

Year 13

  • Debating tasks encourage democratic discussion

Year 7

  • Term 3: Great Speeches unit explores speeches from MLK, Obama, Mandela and Thunberg. They engage with topics that encompass the rights of citizens whilst challenging power structures.
  • Term 2: Chivalry – students learn about the chivalric code which provided a foundation for the rule of law.

Year 8

  • Term 1: Gothic unit – engages with the psychology that humans have the capacity to act badly whilst reinforces the idea that morals guide our actions and the law is there to punish if we step outside of it.
  • Term 4: Civil obedience is explored through Romeo and Juliet – checks and balances are seen through the Prince’s characters as he moderates the powerful families’ actions.

Year 9

  • Terms 3 and 4: Dystopia – responsibility we engage with the idea of the value of democracy through texts that have dictatorships and totalitarian governments.

Year 10

  • Term 1: In Frankenstein, similar to dystopia, students engage with ideas on morals and social conscience. Additionally, the trial of Justine in comparison to Victor’s explores the idea of class and bias in relation to judicial law.

Year 7

  • The Art of Rhetoric unit focuses speeches dealings with human rights issues e.g. MLK, Obama, Greta
  • Speech reading and writing develops their rhetoric and gives them the tools to express themselves honestly and fully.

Year 8

  • The poetry unit builds an appreciation of poetry as a significant form of expression. It exposes students to issues that have impeded on human rights before and the backlash against that (war including conscription and manipulative propaganda, cultural poems expressing individual values and rights).
  • Gothic literature of the Victorian period teaches students about the social constraints of the past and helps them to appreciate the liberty they have today.

Year 9

  • Dystopias deal with societies fraught with totalitarian constraints. Students explore what life would be like living in a world with less freedom, and fewer rights, and analyse the impact it has on the characters and how it creates unease in the reader. Through these analytical and discussion activities, students formulate their own appreciation of the rights they have and the importance of maintaining liberty.
  • A focus on modern texts like Wonder and A Curious Case of the Dog in the Nighttime helps to build an inclusive ethos for individuals expressing themselves as they truly are. This creates discussions around current social issues and perceptions of others.
  • Similarly to the Gothic study and the Dystopian unit, in studying Romanticism, the Victorian period teaches students about the social constraints of the past and helps them to appreciate the liberty they have today.

Year 10

  • Frankenstein- a recap of Gothic conventions and reviewing past social constraints, this text allows students to appreciate the possible repercussions of individual liberty in the form of punishment for the main character.
  • Macbeth- by reflecting upon a Victorian text, context teaches students to look at the restrictions that existed, such as that on the lower classes or on women, and students are able to make comparisons to the modern era in which many of these constraints no longer exist.

Year 11

  • Poetry- by being able to explore further examples of poetry linked to war and conflict, students are able to reflect upon powerful thoughts and feelings evoked by restrictions to individual liberty. Namely, poems like The Emigree, Kamikaze and Checking Out Me History stand out in this regard.
  • In addition, students study Never Let Me Go, a dystopian text which considers moral and ethical implications of using clones to increase the life-span of people who can afford to harvest them. In discussing this text, students again appreciate their own liberties and should notice the links between this text and previous Year 9 Dystopian study around similar themes: the need for individuality, individual liberty and the need to protect their rights in order to maintain their freedom.

Year 12

  • As with our Year 9 and 11 study of Dystopian texts, this year includes the study of more mature dystopian content (The Handmaid’s Tale). Contextual information covers eras and countries where individual freedoms are not at the level that we enjoy in the UK in our time. This is linked to dystopian texts to explore the significance of our human rights as they stand, and where they could be improved.

Year 8

  • Poems from different cultures engages with poems written by poets with different faiths.

Year 10

  • Macbeth looks at the Divine Right of Kings and through context students look at the different beliefs of protestant and catholic faiths.

Year 11

  • In the Poetry Anthology there are poems written by poets with different faiths.
Geography

Year 7 – Map Skills

  • Maps are a way that people can inform themselves about the work of the government.

Year 7 – Weather & Climate

  • Common agreements on how weather data is collated – meteorological agencies working together internationally

Year 7 – Climate Change

  • International agreements, such as COP 26, Paris, as well as national government policies on carbon emissions.

Year 7 – Sustainability

  • International agreements. have the opportunity to explore and consider different opinions and how voices are heard (e.g. study of NGO’s such as Greenpeace and NIMBY issues such as the location of wind farms).
    The understanding that natural resources are shared between countries and the allocation of them is shared.
    Sustainable development is a central theme in Geography and is revisited throughout all key stages. Students recognise the importance of a democratic process of decision-making to ensure that all voices are heard

Year 8 – Biomes

  • The importance of international agreements and law to protect ecosystems, e.g, COP 26.
    Students look at global issues such as deforestation. They evaluate measures taken to protect the rainforest, with a high emphasis on the ‘local view’ and not just a ‘global/national view’ on how to resolve issues.

Year 8 – Tectonics

  • Have opportunities to experience the importance of decision making (e.g. Montserrat decision-making)

Year 8 – Russia

  • Understand the different political systems in modern Europe

Year 9 – Development

  • Development aid? have the opportunity to explore and discuss injustices and inequalities (perceived or real) and challenge and debate these through the exploration of geographical topics (e.g. development history & colonialism)

Year 9 – The Economy

  • The role of democracy in the shaping of an economy. Are societies free to shape their own economy? Is political corruption an issue in global development?

Year 9 – Rivers

  • The role of political organisation in the provision of flood management resources.

Year 10 – Physical Geography

  • Students have the opportunity to explore and consider different opinions and how voices are heard

Year 11 – Urban Issues & Challenges

  • Students consider what the opportunities and challenges are within some urban areas (e.g. cities within countries of different levels of development)

Year 12 – Regenerating Places

  • Levels of Engagement can be measured by National Election Turnout and Local Election turnout. Engagement in society can also be measured by participation (number attending and support for) community groups, and also the development of such groups in a society. Participation is seen to vary according to age, ethnicity, length of residence, levels of deprivation and gender. Successful regeneration and successful communities rely on high levels of community engagement.

Year 13 – Migration

  • Opportunity to learn about injustices and inequalities in countries and how this has led to conflict (both historical and up to present day).
    Studying of the British Empire and how it was founded, the building of colonies, and how the Commonwealth retains a sense of unity.

Year 13 – Superpowers

  • Superpowers are looked at in terms of their mechanisms of power. This varies. Students look at historical superpowers such as the British Empire and colonialism, where colonies were seen as subordinate to the main power and without democracy. Cold War superpowers contrast the power struggle for capitalism versus communism.

Year 7 – Map Skills

  • The demarcation of legal boundaries on maps

Year 7 – Climate Change

  • Explore and evaluate the outcomes of meetings of governments and policy makers (e.g. Climate Change Conferences)

Year 7 – Sustainability

  • Explore and evaluate the outcomes of meetings of governments and policy makers (e.g. Climate Change Conferences)

Year 8 – Biomes

  • Reducing desertification – understanding areas are designated national parks in order for protection of them

Year 8 – Tectonics

  • The importance of law in hazardous situations, such as post-natural disasters

Year 8 – Russia

  • Appreciation of living in a society with a clear rule of law.

Year 9 – Development

  • Have opportunities to explore and understand how governments have influenced and shaped nations through law (including the study of population policies)

Year 9 – The Economy

  • Explore the ways in which policy making at a local and global scale can influence both the physical and human landscape (e.g. the National Parks Act – 1949; legally binding commitments of the Kyoto protocol etc; EU law – e.g. Common Agricultural policy)

Year 9 – Rivers

  • Flood management – different agreements used to protect areas at risk of flooding

Year 10 – Physical Geography

  • Students explore the ways in which policy making at a local and global scale can influence both the physical and human landscapes. Students also explore and evaluate the outcomes of meetings of national government and how this filters to local governments and policy makers.

Year 12 – Globalisation

  • Discussing issues surrounding globalisation and the legislation that has derived as a result of this. Discussions surrounding anti-globalisation and newly established laws with increasing barriers between countries/nations.

Year 12 – Regenerating Places

  • Planning law determines how regeneration can take place. Students are made aware of how this process works including the role of Central Government in making/passing planning law, and the role of local government in applying it in the local context, together with the role of democracy in elected councillors voting on planning decisions in the local area. The necessity of law to provide opportunities for public consultation and revisions, together with the need for environmental impact assessments and other legal requirements. Students also look at secondary data regarding crime and investigate data relating to their own local place, and several contrasting places.

Year 13 – Migration

  • Understanding of the laws and legislation that encourage and prohibit the movement of people. Exploration and evaluating the outcomes of meetings of governments and international organisations and policy makers.
    Consideration to the geopolitical issues that have dissected communities and caused conflict, and how international organisations attempt to combat such issues through adoption of international laws.
    Geography encourages students to investigate countries from around the world and helps our students to empathize with people from different countries and people with different cultures around the world. For instance, the importance of human rights and laws and the legislation that is established to help people around the world. Studying of The UN, it inception, its structure and the legislation that has been developed over time to protect people and communities worldwide.

Year 13 – Superpowers

  • The law is seen under different scales for superpowers – for example the Law of individual countries, together with the Law for Umbrella organisations such as the United Nations – and their role and powers.Law is also covered under trade agreements and issues such as patents and copyright. The importance of diplomacy is covered, including the various mechanisms of Hard and Soft power to influence decisions and avoid war.

Year 7 – Map Skills

  • Exploring using maps

Year 7 – Weather & Climate

  • Is weather and climate data open and accessible to all?

Year 7 – Climate Change

  • Have an opportunity to explore issues surrounding human rights (e.g. migration, refugee crisis, fairtrade etc.)

Year 7 – Sustainability

  • Have an opportunity to explore issues individual responsibilities and duties with regards to global sustainability.
    Students participate in fieldwork in Geography, in which they investigate their environment. In Year 7, students visit their local community and consider links to areas of sustainability.

Year 8 – Biomes

  • Have an opportunity to explore issues individual responsibilities and duties.
    Students participate in fieldwork in Geography, in which they investigate their environment. In Year 8, students visit Kew Gardens to investigate different biomes and their adaptations to their unique conditions.

Year 8 – Tectonics

  • Explore issues relating to aid and helping others affected by natural disasters

Year 8 – Russia

  • Appreciation of living in a democratic society

Year 9 – Development

  • Rural to urban migration – reasons as to why people move to rural areas to urban areas.

Year 9 – The Economy

  • Are global citizens free to be part of a liberal economy, e.g. UK; or are they governed directly through state control, e.g. China?

Year 11 – Urban Issues & Challenges

  • Understand the importance of identifying and combating discrimination including tackling stereotypes, for example, LICs and HICs

Year 12 – Globalisation

  • Students’ understanding and appreciation of the wide range of cultural influences that have shaped their own heritage are studied in a variety of topics related to the UK, e.g. settlement and migration.

Year 12 – Regenerating Places

  • Views and conflicts underpin the regeneration of areas, and respect for all groups of people are incorporated into successful schemes, especially through public participation.

Year 13 – Migration

  • Students are able to explore issues surrounding human rights.

Year 13 – Superpowers

  • International Law and liberties underpin alliances to which superpowers belong

Year 7 – What is Geography?

  • Understanding different societies is at the core of human geography.

Year 7 – Weather & Climate

  • Understanding that different areas have different weather forecasts and the social, economic and environmental impacts this has.

Year 7 – Climate Change

  • Students consider the impacts of Climate Change on different locations, i.e coastal areas and the impact that this may have on them.

Year 7 – Sustainability

  • Students consider the impacts of tourism on certain communities and the ways to reduce this – sustainable tourism. Especially with Feynan and its ecolodge.

Year 8 – Biomes

  • Students are aware of the different communities and their adaptation to certain environments, e.g. hot deserts like the Thar.

Year 8 – Tectonics

  • Understanding of different communities impacts resulting in tectonic activity, e.g. being able to understand the difference of impacts between a HIC and LIC with an earthquake (New Zealand and Haiti case studies).

Year 9 – Russia

  • Appreciation of living in a society with greater tolerance for others, e.g. LGBTQ+.

Year 9 – Development

  • Understanding that different countries have different levels of development and this may have an effect on different communities. Diversity is celebrated in Geography. The importance of tolerance is promoted throughout the Key Stages, with students frequently being asked to see issues from different perspectives to help guide their judgements. For instance, the ‘development’ unit and the
    importance of providing a tolerant and accepting environment to ensure that conflict does not take place.

Year 9 – The Economy

  • Are economies open and accessible to all, or are some minorities excluded from economic opportunities and development on the basis of their different faith or belief?

Year 11 – Urban Issues

  • Students consider the diversity of urban areas and how planners carefully consider the involvement of communities within these areas.
    A fundamental concept which is revisited in Geography is the importance of public institutions and the decisions that are made regarding them. The importance of politics and the impacts on public services are discussed throughout a number of topics. For example, in Year 11, students develop an understanding of the role of population change in the UK. (Changing Economic World). They investigate the importance of migration and an ageing population in understanding the changing needs for services in the UK. Consideration given to the north – south divide and the recent policy with regards to ‘levelling up’, and how to reduce such disparity. Students are also exposed to the importance of migration in this country and understand the advantages that migration brings.

Year 12 – Globalisation

  • Globalisation enables students to understand the differences between people across the world. Sharing of information, ideas, and cultures.

Year 12 – Regenerating Places

  • Regeneration is studied in the context of the need for regeneration and the problems experienced by segregation, especially that which might be created by different faiths etc. A case study of Detroit in USA and the problems of de-industrialisation and ‘White flight’ from inner city areas and increasing concentrations of poor black people replacing them is covered. Successful regeneration is seen as that which addresses these sorts of issues and involves making all people feel members of society. Fieldwork allows pupils to investigate firsthand, and by looking at secondary data about places they are familiar with and contrasting with those areas they are less familiar with.

Year 13 – Migration

  • Develop an understanding and respect of different cultures, and how governments and policy makers attempt to assimilate society. Respecting and and understanding diversity of life in other countries.
    How nationalism is reinforced through education, sport and culture and political parties.

Year 13 – Superpowers

  • Commons goals often create mutual respect. The issues such as climate change require countries to understand different perspectives on development and historic levels of pollution in order to create a pathway whereby countries are prepared to sign up to challenging environmental targets.
History

Year 7

  • Term 2 Feudal System, origins of Parliament (Witan)
  • Term 4 Medieval Queens and limitations of hereditary monarchy

Year 8

  • Term 1 The English Civil War – rise of Parliament
  • Term 2 The French Revolution – Declaration of Rights of Man
  • Term 3 The British Empire – Parliament’s role in abolition of slavery
  • Term 4 The Civil Rights Movement – enfranchisement
  • Term 5 The Victorians – Chartists, enfranchisement, Suffragettes.

Year 9

  • Term 2 The Rise of Hitler – differences between democracy and dictatorship
  • Term 4 Post-War Britain – changing political attitudes, laws for sexual equality, EU referendum
  • Term 6 – Russia, Analysis of Autocracy in Russia and implementation of democracy following 1905 revolution.

Year 10

  • Term 2 Cold War – Communism a capitalism as competing systems
  • Term 4 – Cold War, Hungary 1956 & Prague Spring 1968, democratic reform of communist systems.

Year 11

  • Term 3 Edward I, establishment of Parliament.
  • Term 3 Edward I, extent and limitations of royal power.

Year 12

  • Term 1 Establishing Democratic Government, Post-WW1 Nature of the Constitution
  • Term 4 Democracy reestablished – the FRG

Year 13

  • Term 1 Problems of the Liberal Government

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Year 7

  • Term 3 Crime and Punishment in the Middle Ages
  • Term 5 Peasants’ Revolt – protest and political rights

Year 8

  • Term 1 The English Civil War – Cromwell and war crimes in Ireland
  • Term 2 The French Revolution- protest and political rights
  • Term 3 The British Empire – the slave trade
  • Term 4 The Civil Rights Movement – segregation and protest and political rights
  • Term 5 The Victorians – Suffragettes, Crime and Punishment.

Year 9

  • Term 1 The First World War – conscription and conscientious objectors
  • Term 2 The Rise of Hitler – consolidation of power
  • Term 2 Life in Nazi Germany – erosion of civil liberties
  • Term 3 The Holocaust
  • Term 4 Post-War Britain – protest movements and political change
  • Term 6 Tsarist Russia – opposition political groups and revolution

Year 10

  • Term 1 – Russia, political purges, discrimination against nation minorities, and victimisation of ‘kulak’ peasants in Soviet Union.
  • Term 2 Cold War – Communism and capitalism as competing systems

Year 11

  • Term 3 – Edward I, development of legal systems, protections e.g. Statute of Westminster.

Year 12

  • Term 2 Democracy to Dictatorship Control and coercion in Nazi Germany
  • Term 4 Individual Human Rights in the FRG

Year 13

  • Term 3 Repression and terror in Fascist Italy.
  • Term 1 – British Experience of War, First World War restrictions of civil liberties during war time including control of the press.

Year 7

  • Term 1 Early migration to Britain and beginnings of a multicultural society
  • Term 3 Expulsion of the Jews Assessment – examines causes of anti-Semitic persecution
  • Term 5 The Crusades and Achievements of the Islamic world
  • Term 6 The Reformation – Catholicism and Protestantism.

Year 8

  • Term 1 The English Civil War – Catholics, Protestants and Puritans
  • Term 3 The British Empire – impact of empire on colonisers and colonised and understanding contribution of migration to multicultural society.
  • Term 4 The Civil Rights Movement – challenging prejudice and discrimination.
  • Term 5 The Victorians – Treatment of the poor, disabled people, homosexuals, conflict between religious and scientific ideas.

Year 9

  • Term 1 The First World War – contribution of soldiers of empire
  • Term 2 The Rise of Hitler/Life in Nazi Germany – consolidation of power, treatment of minorities
  • Term 3 The Holocaust
  • Term 4 Post-War Britain – LGBT+ rights, Women’s Liberation Movement, Civil Rights for Catholics in Northern Ireland, Britain’s relationship with Europe

Year 10

  • Term 1 – Russia, discrimination against nation minorities and victimisation of ‘kulak’ peasants in Soviet Union. Use of propaganda.

Year 11

  • Term 1 – Migration, intolerance as a cause of migration for Huguenots and eastern European Jews.
  • Term 1 – Migration, discrimination against Irish migrants to Britain (19thC.).
  • Term 2 – Migration, discrimination faced by Windrush migrants from 1950s to 1980s.
  • Term 4 – Edward I, discrimination against and ejection of Jewish minority in England.

Year 12

  • Term 3 Treatment of Ethnic Minorities in Nazi Germany. The Final Solution.
  • Term 4 Denazification post WW2
  • Term 5 Foreign policy objectives of Hitler

Year 13

  • Term 3 Anti Semitic policies
  • Term 4 Foreign policy objectives of Mussolini Attitudes of the Vatican
Latin & Classics

Year 8 Latin

  • Stage 11 of the Cambridge Latin Course is focussed on local elections in Pompeii – students create their own campaign posters for a Roman election.

Year 10 Latin

  • As part of their Roman Civilisation module, students study politics in the Roman world, with particular focus on local elections, including campaigning and the duties of key elected officials.

Year 12 Classics

  • Greek Theatre is inherently linked to Athenian Democracy – students learn about the role of the arts in holding corrupt politicians to account.

Year 13 Classics

  • The expression of democratic values as shown through the Panathenaia, where all sections of democratic polis are represented and free to engage in a communal religious festival.

Year 7 Latin

  • Stage 4 of the Cambridge Latin Course deals with law – students translate and act out a short scene set within the basilica – the Roman law-court.

Year 13 Classics

  • The key Roman values that Augustus sought to promote – pietas, virtus, clementia, iustitia – are discussed throughout Virgil’s Aeneid, along with the role of Literature as propaganda.

Year 7 Latin

  • Stage 6 of the Cambridge Latin Course deals with the nature of slavery in the Roman world, including the roles of slaves in Roman society, how a slave might be freed, and Roman views on slavery.

Year 8 Latin

  • Stages 13-16 of the Cambridge Latin Course deal with the Roman invasion of Britain, and students look at the extent to which a Roman lifestyle was forced upon the native Britons.

Year 10 Latin

  • As part of their Roman Civilisation module, students visit the topic of Slavery in more detail, and also look at the increased political rights of freedmen, as well as the duties of a Roman patronus towards his clientes.

Year 13 Classics

  • How Greek religion allows all its followers to make personal decisions regarding their own engagement with the different deities, through personal votive offerings and sacrifices.

Year 7 Latin

  • Stages 1 and 2 of the Cambridge Latin Course introduce students to the Roman house and daily routine, including the significance of the lararium – the shrine to the household gods which was considered an integral part of every home.

Year 8 Latin

  • Stage 19 introduces students to religion in Roman Egypt, showing how the Romans embraced and adopted the religion of conquered countries through their reverence for the Goddess Isis.

Year 9 Latin

  • Stages 21-23 of the Cambridge Latin Course are set in Bath, and look at the Roman habit of creating “hybrid” gods with the native deities of countries they invaded, such as Sulis Minerva.

Year 11 Latin

  • The current topic for the Latin Literature module is Superstition and Magic. This includes Roman beliefs about death and burial practices, means of predicting the future, and ways of interacting with their gods. Students compare this to their understanding of modern beliefs and superstitions.

Year 12 Classics

  • Homer’s Odyssey provides students with their first introduction to the Greek Gods – they compare these very “human,” often petty gods to their more modern understanding of deities.

Year 13 Classics

  • The understanding between Greek cities that they are to propose a truce despite political differences in order to engage in religious festivals and other Panhellenic activities.
Maths

Year 12 Statistics

  • Hypothesis testing is used to test the results of an election and if the public opinion of a politician has changed.

Every Lesson

  • High standards of the pupils in terms of their behaviour and conduct. Any disruptive behaviour or failure to produce homework is followed up with a consequence.

Year 10 – Unit 11

  • Speed = Distance/Time is included and discussion will include the importance of keeping to the national speed limits.

Every Lesson

  • Respect for others views and opinions. Students are free to give their answers to the Mathematics questions or share their views and ideas with others.

Year 10 – Unit 11

  • Compound interest and VAT are discussed here and staff remind pupils of the importance of interest rates and looking after their personal finances. For example a larger interest rate on borrowing can get students into financial difficulty.

Every Lesson

  • Any comments which are heard in the classroom are dealt with in a firm and robust manner. If a student is rude or disrespectful to another pupil or to the teacher, this is taken very seriously and an appropriate punishment is given.

Mathematics Block Displays

  • Corridor displays celebrate diversity in Mathematics, highlighting achievements of a wide range of Mathematicians in history from different genders, race or sexual orientations.

Regularly Mentioned

  • Mathematics is a universal language understood by people from across the world in different countries and cultures the language of Mathematics transcends all peoples.

Occasionally Mentioned

  • Algebra is Arabic in origin along with our number system which has its roots in Arabic.
MFL
  • All pupils are encouraged to listen to each other and to show respect regardless of differing opinions
  • Discussion of how to create an ideal school
  • Analysing the value of living in the countryside or town
  • Discussion of freedom versus dictatorship
  • Gender equality
  • Year 9 – human rights, children’s rights
  • Year 9 – for or against veganism/ vegetarianism
  • GCSE – charity and volunteering
  • Year 9 – the environment
  • GCSE – the environment
  • GCSE – life at school and school rules
  • A-Level – cybersociety, bullying, hacking
  • A-Level – charity and volunteering
  • A-Level – immigration, diversity, multicultural society
  • A-Level – Spanish Civil War
  • A-Level – French strikes
  • French film – La Haine – police brutality, gang violence, racism
  • Spanish Novel – Bodas de Sangre – rigid traditional family structures
  • Spanish film – Pan’s Labyrinth – dictatorship and post-war Spain, repression
  • A-Level – individual research project – dependent on pupil’s choice
  • The importance of school rules.
  • Immigration laws to assist integration,
  • Impact of dictatorship under Franco
  • Year 7 – School subjects
  • Year 8 – digital technology
  • Year 9 – my rights, criminality
  • GCSE – technology and cyberbullying
  • GCSE – the right to express your culture
  • GCSE – poverty and homeless, helping the community
  • GCSE – school rules
  • A-Level – cybersociety, bullying, hacking
  • A-Level – women’s rights in work
  • A-Level – protecting heritage and the effects of tourism
  • A-Level – immigration, diversity, multicultural society
  • A-Level – crime and punishment
  • A-Level – Spanish Civil War
  • A-Level – French strikes
  • French film – La Haine – police brutality, gang violence, racism
  • French novel – homelessness and friendship
  • Spanish Novel – Bodas de Sangre – rigid traditional family structures
  • Spanish film – Pan’s Labyrinth
  • A-Level – individual research project – dependent on pupil’s choice
  • Discussion of value of school rules
  • Discussion of importance of protecting planet
  • Individual response to saving energy and resources
  • Discussion about Franco and dictatorship and freedom fighters
  • KS3 and 4 – Free time and leisure
  • Year 7 – School subjects
  • End of Year 7/8- future plans
  • Year 7/8 – inviting someone to go out
  • Year 8 Module 1 – holidays
  • Year 9 – describing yourself – interests, plans, opinions
  • Year 9 – world of work and future plans
  • Year 9 – healthy living
  • Year 9 – for or against veganism/ vegetarianism
  • GCSE – same sex marriage, whether you want to get married
  • GCSE – free time activities
  • GCSE – the right to express your culture
  • GCSE – where I live, region, home
  • GCSE – healthy and unhealthy living
  • GCSE – the environment
  • GCSE – travel and holidays
  • GCSE – school subjects and choices
  • GCSE – university or work?
  • GCSE – choice of career
  • A-Level – family structures
  • A-Level Spanish – world of work
  • A-Level – French cinema and evolution
  • A-Level – Spanish Civil War
  • A-Level – French strikes
  • French film – La Haine – police britality, gang violence, racism
  • Spanish Novel – Bodas de Sangre – rigid traditional family structures
  • Spanish film – Pan’s Labyrinth – dictatorship and post-war Spain, repression
  • A-Level – individual research project – dependent on pupil’s choice
  • Immigration topic – accepting and respecting others’ faiths and traditions
  • Module 2 Year 7 School system comparison, two countries
  • Year 7 – Friends and family types
  • Year 8 Module 1 – holidays
  • Year 8 Module 2 – festivals and celebrations
  • Year 8 – food culture in Spain
  • Year 8 Module 3 – leisure activities in Africa
  • Year 8 Spanish – future plans in Spanish-speaking countries
  • Year 9 birthday celebrations
  • Year 9 – interview with a refugee
  • Year 9 – planning a host family stay in Spain
  • GCSE – friends and family
  • GCSE – technology and social media
  • GCSE – customs and traditions
  • GCSE – travels and holidays – regions of France and Spain
  • A-Level – family structures
  • A-Level – heritage, tourism and the impact on the environment
  • A-Level – music culture
  • A-Level – French cinema and evolution
  • A-Level – Spanish food and heritage
  • A-Level – Spanish Civil War
  • A-Level – individual research project – dependent on pupil’s choice
  • A-Level – French strikes
  • French film – La Haine – police brutality, gang violence, racism
  • French novel – homelessness and friendship
  • Spanish Novel – Bodas de Sangre – rigid traditional family structures
  • Spanish film – Pan’s Labyrinth – dictatorship and post-war Spain, repression
Music
  • All pupils encouraged to share their opinions and listen to each other.
  • Students are instructed how to be an audience. They are encouraged to listen to and support each others’ performance work.
  • Whole class and group decisions are made in a democratic way either by the appointment of a group leader or by vote.

Year 7

  • All pupils have the opportunity to contribute to Year 7 concert and house music.

Year 8

  • Rock and Roll Music – 12 bar blues

Year 9

  • Film Music – topics which are covered in films.

GCSE & A-Level

  • The context of set works.
  • Rules for practise rooms.

Year 7

  • Safety rules when using equipment

Year 8

  • “Rules” of harmony and chords

Year 9

  • Rules about age appropriate film music

GCSE & A-Level

  • Rules from exam boards especially around submission of coursework and plagiarism
  • Every pupil is permitted to use practise rooms and has the freedom to choose the style of music.
  • However, pupils are taught that choice of music should be appropriate to a school setting.

Year 7

  • Freedom of choice of learning and instrument
  • Joining clubs.

Year 8

  • Context of the 12 bar blues and Rock and Roll

Year 9

  • Film Music
  • Services in Cathedral at Christmas and Founder’s Day.

Year 7

  • Samba Music – encouraged to reflect on how it fits into a belief system and respect for that system.

Year 8

  • Respect for different cultures

Year 9

  • Pair work – respect for each other

GCSE & A-Level

  • Context of Set Works
PE

A code of conduct for the school that permeates all subjects, including PE. Pupils are taught about the need for different roles and different responsibilities, including teamwork and decision making. A pupil voice for PE & School Sport (e.g. re curriculum, extracurricular activities, kit).

Pupils are taught about age appropriate rules, fairness and respect, through a variety of PE activities. Pupils learn to work individually and in groups. An established ethos in PE with regard to how to win and lose fairly and understand good sportspersonship. Competition against oneself is encouraged in addition to competition against others.

PE recognises individual differences. Pupils respect individual differences and are confident. There is an ethos where the views of individual pupils are listened to and respected within an acceptable framework. Pupils are taught safely and about safety.

Pupils are taught about historical, cultural and religious differences, through a variety of PE activities. The culture in PE respects cultural differences. Pupils are taught about the environment and different activity contexts. There are appropriate rewards and sanctions in PE for inappropriate behaviour. The school engages in competition and encourages competition within and across the community.

Psychology

Year 12 & 13

  • Students to often vote on what topics they will cover for revision or more complex topics
  • Students sometimes vote on method of learning, to take part in flipped learning or not and how to approach some questions/topics
  • UK laws pushed in forensics and psychopathology (definitions of abnormality) topics to show what is a standard British value
  • Comparison of laws also looked at, as a part of forensics to see differences in UK versus USA laws

Year 12 & 13

  • Reference to plagiarism in RM lesson about peer review – focusing on the importance of the peer review process to avoid copyright/fraud in psychology, alongside evaluating the peer review process
  • Reference to plagiarism RM lesson about ‘sections of a scientific report’. Students learn about the importance of citing and referencing accurately and effectively. Links then made to essay/report writing at university
  • Year 11 students learn about laws in other countries during forensics induction lesson with SXH. They’re encouraged to research how laws in the UK differ to other countries
  • Comparison of laws also looked at, as a part of forensics to see differences in UK versus USA laws
  • Year 12 students are asked to consider how laws different in different countries when evaluating ‘deviation from social norms’ as a definition for abnormality
  • Year 13 students are asked to research how laws in the UK differ to other countries in first forensics lesson
  • Social influence topics looks at, Nazi Germany, My Lai Massacre and Abu Graihb instances of law breaking and how they relate to obedient behaviour.
  • Relationships looking at parasocial relationships with legality behind stalking and obsessive and unreciprocated relationships especially with celebrities

Year 12 & 13

  • Rights that people have to be kept safe regarding social influence and to keep away from social pressure, and demands – this is often linked to more serious criminal offences but also related to students and peer pressure in their everyday life
  • Students to be made aware of eyewitness testimony as they may have an important role in society in keeping people safe, should they ever be called to be a witness in a criminal case.
  • confidentiality is important through psychological research in order to keep people and their data safe, as their data should not be leaked to the public especially if it is sensitive data.
  • Year 12 learn about the ethical issues (rights including consent, right to withdraw, entitlement to psychological help) in psychological research
  • Year 13’s use knowledge of ethical issues to write consent and debrief forms in RM (right to withdraw from psychological research)
  • Students to show respect through the knowledge learnt in social influence, to not abuse power that they may be given in the future, and take advantage of others – we promote a high standard of equality

Year 12 & 13

  • Social influence and social change is looked at in psychology e.g women’s rights and civil right movement, to show how beliefs change over time and sometimes for the better
  • Students learn about the diagnosis of various psychological disorders and we discuss how these can lead to discrimination (e.g. in terms of job applications, etc.)
  • In social influence we look at Nazi Germany, whereby people abused power in order to try to eradicate a whole section of humanity- in this we also discuss equality
  • Throughout the course we have class discussions whereby students are expected to be respectful of peers and their beliefs and ideas.
  • Throughout psychology we look at the cultural variations and ethnocentric ideas whereby in different societies they will have different ideas and viewpoints which should be respected – e.g attachment where we look at different child rearing practices around the world. Particular focus on cultural biases in issues and debates lesson on ‘culture bias’
  • Focus on similarities and differences in criminal justice systems e.g. UK vs. USA, especially in terms of offender profiling. Also focus on how laws vary from culture to culture in forensics and psychopathology
  • Relationships is a key idea for this to look at sexual and gender differences and to promote a more accepting attitude within the classroom whereby we can all accept our differences and live as one idea of humanity rather than focus on the differences
  • Students look at the use of research and questionnaires in order to gather data or look at research which has data regarding viewpoints – such as relationships whereby students will look at the ways different people express their relationship breakdown and accept there will be key differences between them
Politics

Year 10 Citizenship Curriculum

  • Voting and elections, comparative govt systems, devolved institutions

Year 11 Citizenship Curriculum

  • Taking citizenship action; individual project on how to bring about change

Year 12 Politics

  • Voting systems, Functions of Parliament, PM & Cabinet, includes a visit to Parliament

Year 13 Politics

  • EU, Comparative theories

Key Stage 3 & 4 Politics Club

  • Discussing contemporary issues

House Debating

  • Debating contemporary issues

Politician Visits

  • Discussion of politics

Year 10 Citizenship Curriculum

  • The Economy

Year 11 Citizenship Curriculum

  • The Legal System

Year 12 Politics

  • Constitutional Principles, Judicial Independence and Judicial Neutrality, includes a visit to Supreme Court

Year 13 Politics

  • Global Institutions such as the UN, NATO, IMF, World Bank, WTO, ICJ, ECHR, ICC

Key Stage 3 & 4 Politics Club

  • Discussing contemporary issues

House Debating

  • Debating Contemporary issues

Politician Visits

  • Discussion of politics

Year 10 Citizenship Curriculum

  • Comparison of democracy with theocracies and dictatorships

Year 11 Citizenship Curriculum

  • Role of the media and a free press

Year 12 Politics

  • Pressure Groups, influence of the media in elections

Year 13 Politics

  • Functions of NGOs, Human Rights issues and institutions which safeguard them

Key Stage 3 & 4 Politics Club

  • Discussing contemporary issues

House Debating

  • Debating contemporary issues

Politician Visits

  • Discussion of politics

Year 10 Citizenship Curriculum

  • Diversity in the UK

Year 11 Citizenship Curriculum

  • Rights and responsibilities

Year 12 Politics

  • Ideologies: Liberalism, Conservatism, Socialism and Anarchism

Year 13 Politics

  • Understanding issues relating to Human Rights and Environmentalism

Key Stage 3 & 4 Politics Club

  • Debating contemporary issues

House Debating

  • Debating contemporary issues

Politician Visits

  • Discussion of politics
RE

Year 10

  • Peace and Conflict: Lesson on violence and peaceful protest.
  • Peace and Conflict: Lesson on terrorism
  • Peace and Conflict: Lesson on justifications for war – discussion of illegal war

Year 11

  • Religion and Life: Euthanasia (debate and discussion of debate in Parliament)

Year 10

  • Peace and Conflict: Lesson on violence and peaceful protest.
  • Peace and Conflict: Lesson on terrorism
  • Peace and Conflict: Lesson on justifications for war – discussion of illegal war
  • Human Rights and Social Justice: Exploitation of the poor

Year 11

  • Religion and Life: Abortion
  • Religion and Life: Euthanasia
  • Relationships and Families: Christian attitudes to sexuality – discussion of the law
  • Relationships and Families: Christian teachings about gender equality – discussion of the law

Year 10

  • Peace and Conflict: Lesson on violence and peaceful protest.
  • Peace and Conflict: Lesson on terrorism
  • Human Rights and Social Justice: Human Rights abuses
  • Human Rights and Social Justice: Exploitation of the poor
  • Christian Practices: Food Banks

Year 11

  • Religion and Life: Abortion
  • Religion and Life: Euthanasia
  • Relationships and Families: Christian attitudes to sexuality
  • Relationships and Families: Christian teachings about gender equality

Year 10

  • Peace and Conflict: Lesson on violence and peaceful protest.
  • Peace and Conflict: Lesson on terrorism
  • Human Rights and Social Justice: Social justice
  • Human Rights and Social Justice: Human Rights abuses
  • Human Rights and Social Justice: Exploitation of the poor
  • Christian Practices: Food Banks

Year 11

  • Religion and Life: Abortion
  • Religion and Life: Euthanasia
  • Relationships and Families: Christian attitudes to sexuality
  • Relationships and Families: Christian teachings about gender equality
Science

Year 9 Disease, Year 10 Term 4, Year 13 Term 4 Biology

  • Discovering vaccinations and understanding that people have their own beliefs on the efficacy and have a right to their beliefs.

Year 10 Term 4 Biology

  • Understanding the peer review process
  • Understanding the purpose and necessity of clinical trials.

Year 11 Chemistry

  • An exploration of certain topical issues such as energy security and climate change, which are often news headline features, takes place in year the year 11 curriculum for all students, including a need to be able to evaluate the credibility of sources and recognise the impact of climate change on society, including British society, at large. We often explore the ways in which Britain is world-leading in some areas related to clean air and carbon mitigation.

GCSE Physics P1 Year 10 Term 4

  • Fusion vs fission is a hot topic given the costly and difficult process to decommission a fission power plant vs the expense of research behind fusion.

GCSE Physics P1 Year 10 Term 2

  • In topic 3 Energy conservation is discussed in terms of use of insulation systems – this is revisited in topic 5 where a core practical focuses on heat loss from hot objects. Embodies individual choice to help preserve limited resources or not. Should government be more involved here?

Key Stage 3 Year 9 Fuels & Combustion Topic

  • Discussion: How we are primarily reliant on burning fossil fuels for our energy needs. How society has change to realise that this is not sustainable and its effect on the environment. How society is changing to recognise the need to reduce reliance on fossil fuels and the promotion of non-renewable resources of energy

Year 12 Physics Core Practicals – throughout the course with a particular emphasis in Year 12 Term 4 and Year 13 Term 3

  • Core Practicals 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, 14 and 15 all have a risk assessment element. The requirement for providing for the health and safety of the student and others in the vicinity is developed through a series of risk assessments that they undertake. Core practical 8 involves an activity in which students undertake a risk assessment from the viewpoint of a teacher planning a class practical using lasers. Students use safety information to plan how the practical can be undertaken given a room plan, ensuring the safety of the students doing the practical, the students who may be doing other work at the same time, and people passing the lab or entering it. In Core Practical 15 students use guidance from the CLEAPSS school science service to undertake a risk assessment and hence learn about regulations and documents such as codes of practice. Students’ safe working is assessed in Core Practicals 4, 5, 8, 13 and 15.

Key Stage 5 Biology (various times of the year)

  • Practical requirement to research and write a scientific method. They must reference, and not plagiarise.

Biology (all years at all times)

  • Risk assessments have been carried out for all practical activities. CLEAPS guidance is followed. Students wear goggles for practicals that have a risk. Fume cupboards are used when using volatile solvents.

Year 9 Term 5 Biology

  • Doping in sport and discussing why it’s illegal in the sports. Focusing on the social and physical reasons why people would want to do, and how it damages the reputation of the sport.

Chemistry (all year groups at all times)

  • We enforce simple rules such as: No eating and drinking in laboratories: Appropriate dress / no jewellery / no (extended) nails essential to safe laboratory work.

Year 11 Chemistry

  • In the ‘nanoparticles’ topic students consider and discuss some of the potential issues with introducing nanoscale particulates into the environment, including the potential for unknown wider effects on other nations and other economies, potentially infringing international law. For instance, some of the countries worst affected by microplastics produce very few themselves.

Year 12 & 13 Chemistry (in all practical work and core practical activity)

  • A recognition that health and safety legislation must be followed for all work where COSHH applies (which is all practical work). In many cases students produce these risk assessments themselves

GCSE Physics P1 Year 10 Term 4

  • Safety aspects related to use of ionising radiations explained and linked to the risks of irradiation and contamination

GCSE Physics P1 Year 10 Term 2

  • Possible dangers of mobile phone microwave frequencies are discussed related to experiments conducted on rats.

GCSE Physics P1 Year 10 Term 1

  • In topic 2, lesson 13 we discuss safe driving, reasons for the laws relating to driving under the influence of drink/drugs or use of mobile phones while driving and the stopping distances published in the highway code.
  • In Topic 3 whilst discussing changes in our use of energy resources for the generation of electricity students will learn how fossil fuel use in the UK has declined in order to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and they may well discuss the role of international agreements e.g. Kyoto Protocol and the change in a national strategy for energy use and consequential changes in laws (but this is not a requirement of the scheme of work)

Year 12 Physics Core Practicals – throughout the course with a particular emphasis in Year 12 Term 4 and Year 13 Term 3

  • Through the risk assessment activities students learn how their right to safety and wellbeing is provided in school and in scientific establishments.

Year 9 Disease, Year 10 Term 4, Year 13 Term 4 Biology

  • Discovering vaccinations and understanding that people have their own beliefs on the efficacy and have a right to their beliefs.

Biology (all years at all times)

  • Through the risk assessment activities students learn how their right to safety and wellbeing is provided in school and in scientific establishments.

Year 10 Chemistry

  • When considering the development of Chemistry as a science, we may explore the way in which many pioneering chemists were rich aristocrats and profiteers of the slave trade, discussing whether their names should be struck from the historical record because of how they obtained their funds, rather than what they did with their wealth.

Year 7 Chemistry

  • Students learn in their first Chemistry unit that safety is the responsibility of everybody, and everybody has the right to a safe and purposeful working environment.

Year 9 Chemistry

  • Students learn about incomplete combustion and the serious consequences of carbon monoxide poisoning. They learn about signs to look out for and what they can do to protect themselves and others they live with.

GCSE Physics P1 Year 10 Term 3

  • In the topic on waves, Global Warming is discussed and how the Earth’s temperature is increasing as ‘greenhouse’ gases increase in the atmosphere. Who’s responsibility is this to combat?

GCSE Physics P1 Year 10 Term 4

  • In Radioactivity unit we study uses of radioisotopes and weigh up the benefits of radioactivity with their side effects

GCSE Physics P1 Year 10 Term 2

  • In topic 3 Energy conservation is discussed in terms of use of insulation systems – this is revisited in topic 5 where a core practical focuses on heat loss from hot objects. Embodies individual choice to help preserve limited resources or not.

Year 10 Chemistry, CP Neutralisation

  • Neutralisation is the reaction of an acid with a base that results in the pH moving towards seven. It is a useful process that occurs in everyday life with the treatment of acid indigestion and the treating of acidic soil by adding lime.

Year 13 Physics Term 3

  • In the Particle Physics unit students learn about the change in scientists’ beliefs about the nature of matter and the development of theories about the structure of atoms, sub-atomic particles and the concepts of conservation of mass and conservation of energy, leading to the concept of mass-energy conservation.

Year 10 Biology Term 2

  • Research and debate on Stem cell uses. Understand the scientific need to research, but understanding the ethical and moral objections to it.

Year 10 Biology Term 2, Year 13 Biology Term 4

  • Research and debate on Genetic engineering uses. Understand the scientific need to research, but understanding the ethical and moral objections to it.

Year 13 Biology Term 4

  • Research and debate on gene therapy. Understand the scientific need to research, but understanding the ethical and moral objections to it.

Year 10 Term 2, Year 13 Term 4

  • Sex determination and that sex is more than the inheritance of the X and Y chromosomes.

Year 9 Disease, Year 10 Term 4, Year 13 Term 4 Biology

  • Discovering vaccinations and understanding that people have their own beliefs on the efficacy and have a right to their beliefs.

Year 10 Term 2 Biology

  • Human genome project has changed the direction of medicine and what Scientists are capable of doing. But genetic screening can lead to discrimination.
  • Research and debate on transplants. Understand the scientific need to research, but understanding the ethical and moral objections to it.

Year 10 Term 4 Biology

  • Understanding the different theories surrounding evolution. Explaining how Darwin and Wallace struggled to publish their findings because of the clash it had with the Christian teachings.

Year 11 Term 3 Biology

  • Research and debate on IVF. Understand the scientific need to research, but understanding the ethical and moral objections to it.

Year 13 Chemistry

  • In the ‘acids’ topic students learn how Svante Arrhenius was vilified for scientifically ‘heretical’ theories on ionic theory, which later proved to be correct, leading to his award of the Nobel Prize (but not before his career had been ruined by a pro-consensus pro-dogma establishment). Analogues are then drawn to the RC Church censorship of Copernicus and Galileo.

GCSE Physics P1 Year 10 Term 2

  • Topic on space explores how different theories of the solar system have developed and have changed. Religious beliefs have had to shift given the discoveries made in the Sixteenth Century.

Key Stage 3 Year 9 Fuels & Combustion Topic

  • Discussing the problem of acid rain. Where those countries that pollute (release acidic gases are often not the countries that suffer the consequences of acid rain. How British and international law needs to adapt to combat this.